• John Beresford
    4
    Hi. Has anyone got any feedback on the use of CO2 monitors to measure the levels of carbon dioxide in ringing chambers? I understand that this is an indicator of risk for Covid transmission.
  • Alison Hodge
    15
    John - there was quite an extensive article in The Ringing World a few weeks ago. Have you seen that?
  • Simon Linford
    15
    Yes John there is a lot of detial on it on the Covid guidance section of the Council website, inclduing now recommendations of good CO2 meters to use.

    I have done quite a few tests myself which generally accord with what I would have expect - well ventilated ringing chambers not being a problem, and poorly ventilated ringing chambers being a problem.

    I have had quite a bit of feedback from others as well, for instance from AJB last week, including from towers where the CO2 readings have been very high. What may be happening in response to very high readings is ringers deciding that the meter must be wrong, or that it doesn't really matter!

    At one tower near me, Selly Oak, which is a small and unventilated ringing chamber, the reading went up to 1000 in one burst of wedding ringing.
  • A J Barnfield
    10
    Speaking as a keyboard warrior and not a qualified heating and ventilation engineer I don't think that absolute levels of CO2 are particularly the issue but more the rate of change. Might I suggest that if the rates are rising while we are in the RR then then ventilation is not adequate and if they are rising quickly then the ventilation is probably poor to near non existent.

    I have not heard much talk about mechanical ventilation but plenty of talk about opening things to let natural air flow do the trick.

    I guess (and it is only that) there are probably plenty of places where without mechanical ventilation the chances of getting adequate air flow are slim. Anyone have an informed view?

    And for the winter when I point out that it might be a bit nippy with all the windows open the general response seems to be that we will just need to wrap up. I am far from sure.

    I think we need to be looking and mechanical ventilation that warms the air. Just my guess. Any informed opinion on that?
  • Alan Rowe
    1
    We bought one to use at our tower. It was easy to use, and having carried out measurements helped to build confidence among ringers. It's also been used by a few other local towers. There are some notes on our website: https://sites.google.com/view/dccr/hardware/ventilation
  • A J Barnfield
    10
    Thank you for your post lan and the useful web page and interesting graphs. What are your thoughts about winter ringing?
  • Simon Linford
    15
    I don't agree I'm afraid. The absolute CO2 level is important because that is a measure of the ventilation. For instance if during ringing your CO2 meter has gone to a steady state 400, then you have decent venitlation that is refreshing the air often enough to keep the CO2 level at 400, which is good. If the CO2 level in steady state is 1000 then that indicates that the ventilation is poor because the CO2 being generated by the band is only being matched by the removal of CO2 by fresh air.
  • A J Barnfield
    10
    OK. I'll go with that. If we are looking to have ventilation good enough to keep CO2 to background levels my guess is that a lot of towers will struggle, particularly on calm* days.

    Anyone having a practice on Thursday or Friday evenings this week with all the windows open let us know how you get on.

    *That is a calm wind, not calm ringers.
  • Paul Wotton
    1
    We tried one at Fridays practice with about 12 people in a reasonably sized ringing chamber with windows open on the North and South paces of the tower. Levers rose from about 400 ppm rising into the 900's by the end of the practice.

    The results do however give me, and others, an excuse for making trips as quarters and peals progress, as a quick internet search on "co2 brain function" showed. This included the following link: https://www.news-medical.net/news/20200421/Atmospheric-CO2-levels-can-cause-cognitive-impairment.aspx
  • Simon Linford
    15
    Fresh air for concentration is very noticeable if you ring long peals of things that are complicated. There's a very clear correlation between the number of trips and getting enough air into the room.
  • Alison Hodge
    15
    What is anyone's view on which specific CO2 meter to buy please? What is their availability, ease of use, effectiveness, cost etc for such monitors? Are they stand alone or do they need a laptop / phone or similar to present the results.
  • Simon Linford
    15
    We have got some specific guidance on the Covid guidance section of the CC website. You need to scroll down about half the page though https://cccbr.org.uk/coronavirus/

    I think I'll reorganise that page now!
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